The Networked North: Borders and Borderlands in the Canadian Arctic Region

Edited by Heather Nicol and P. Whitney Lackenbauer

The Networked North identifies and addresses key lenses for understanding cross-border cooperation in the North American Arctic under conditions of globalization, climate change and changing international relations. Each chapter focuses upon a particular theme influencing cross border relationships, such as historical legacies, cultural relationships, cross-border flows of people and goods, security arrangements, governance practices and sustainability challenges. Twelve short chapters systematically define the ways in which Arctic and sub-Arctic borderlands are uniquely situated within processes of climate change, devolution, globalization, resurgent indigeneity, and neo-realist geopolitical processes. All authors acknowledge how the North has been reterritorialized by each of these processes in ways that encourage the networked nature of sovereignty and territoriality.

 

ISBN: 978-0-9684896-5-9 (pdf)

Heather Nicol and P. Whitney Lackenbauer, eds. The Networked North: Borders and Borderlands in the Canadian Arctic Region. Edited book with Heather Nicol. Waterloo: Borders in Globalization/Centre on Foreign Policy and Federalism. vi, 198 pp.

Networked-North-cover

Contents

INTRODUCTION

Regionalization, Globalization and Arctic Borders: An Interpretive Framework by Heather Nicol and P. Whitney Lackenbauer 

PART ONE: CULTURE, HISTORY, IDENTITY

Chapter One: Layered Landscapes, Layered Identities. Historic Narratives, Arctic Aesthetics, and Indigenous Agency in Canada’s Anthropocene by Victoria Herrmann

Chapter Two: Re-Bordering the North: Governance, Northern Alliances and the Evolution of the Circumpolar World by Ken Coates and Carin Holroyd

 PART TWO: GOVERNANCE AND POLICY

Chapter Three: Crossborder Indigenous Collaboration and the Western Arctic Borderland by Barry Scott Zellen

Chapter Four: Arctic Thaw and the Future of the Arctic Council: An Ecosystem-Based Analysis of the Region’s Governance Prospects by Jennifer Spence

Chapter Five: Identifying Changing Arctic Policy Preferences—Canada and the United States Compared by Douglas C. Nord

PART THREE: SECURITY, SOVEREIGNTY, AND BORDER MANAGEMENT

Chapter Six: Challenges of Sea Ice Prediction for Arctic Marine Policy and Planning by Scott R. Stephenson and Rebecca Pincus

Chapter Seven: The Territorial North and Canada’s International Arctic Security by P. Whitney Lackenbauer and Suzanne Lalonde

Chapter Eight: Managing Flows: A Profile of Regional Border Security Management in the Territorial North by Heather Nicol, Adam Lajeunesse, and Karen Everett

PART FOUR: BORDERLANDS, ECONOMIES, AND SUSTAINABILITY

Chapter Nine: National Border Management Polices and Their Effect on Regional Trade: A Study of the Yukon Exporting Industry by Karen Everett

Chapter Ten: Protocol: Soft Technologies of Neoliberal Geographies by Liam Kennedy-Slaney

Chapter Eleven: The Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council: Management Across Borders by Leslie Collins